Festivals in Lucknow




Lucknow is a place known for its rich cultural heritage. In Lucknow, festivals are celebrated with much enthusiasm and fanfare and every individual, irrespective of their caste and religion celebrates each and every festival including Eid, Christmas, Diwali , Holi, Dussehra and all other festivals . In celebration you can see the rich cultural heritage of Lucknow Here is list of festivals and celebrations throughout the year in Lucknow.
Januarary:
New Year Celebration:
New is celebrated with enthusiasm in Lucknow. On New Year eve lots of event took place every year in city. Clubs, Lawns and many societies arrange New Year party. Malls are especially decorated and lots of people come there and in Hazaratganj on New Year eve. Youths go Discotheque to celebrate New Year.





Makar Sankranti:
It is festival in India celebrated in month of Januarary usually it falls on 14th Jan. On Makar Sankranti, the sun goes to uttaranyan according to Indian Astrology, i.e. the transition of the Sun from Dhanu rashi (Sagittarius) to Makara rashi (Capricorn). People take ritual bath in the river and then  Daan Khichdi(made from rice and lentils) on this day and eat khichdi too on this day. There is also tradition of making Til Ladoo in this festival. People also fly kites on this day.
Lohri: Lohri marks the culmination of winter, and is celebrated on the 13th day of January in the month of Paush or Magh, a day before Makar Sankranti. For Punjabis, this is more than just a festival, it is also an example of a way of life. Lohri celebrates fertility and the spark of life. People gather round the bonfires, throw sweets, puffed rice and popcorn into the flames, sing popular songs and exchange greetings.
The focus of Lohri is on the bonfire. The traditional dinner with makki ki roti and sarson ka saag is quintessential. The prasad comprises of five main things: til, gazak, gur, moongphali, phuliya and popcorn. There is puja, involving parikrama around the fire and distribution of prasad. This symbolises a prayer to Agni, the spark of life, for abundant crops and prosperity.

Guru Gobind Singh Jayanti:
Celebrated by the Sikhs, the birthday of their tenth and last guru, this day witnesses’ large processions and special prayer gatherings at all Gurudwaras.
Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Nanak (Sikh Guru), was born at Patna Sahib on December 22, 1666, (Poh Sudi Saptmi). His birthday generally falls in December or January or sometimes twice within a year as it is calculated according to Hindu Bikrami Calendar, which is based on the lunar calendar. According to the Nanakshahi Calendar, the birthday of Guru Gobind Singh Sahib falls annually on January 5.
Republic Day:
Republic Day is celebrated on January 26th every year. It is one of India’s national festival. It was on January 26th, 1950 that the constitution of India came into force and India became a truly Sovereign, Democratic and Republic state.
Republic Day is celebrated with great sprit in Lucknow. All the Government buildings are decorated for this event. Vidhan Bhavan is decorated with tricolor and lights. In eve of Republic Day the beauty of city is watchable.
As being capital of Uttar Pradesh the Republic Day is celebrated with great pomp and show in front of the Assembly House. The Governor of the state took the salute and hoisted the National Flag on this day. The Repulic Day celebrations include a grand parade, cultural programmes and tableaus from various institutions.
Febuarary:
Vasant Panchami:
Vasant Panchami is the Hindu festival that highlights the coming of spring. This festival is usually celebrated in Magh Sud 5, which is between the months of January and February in Gregorian calendar.
Vasant Panchami is the festival dedicated to Saraswati, the goddess of learning. This Panchami is also known as Saraswati Day. It is believed that this day is Saraswati’s birthday. Hindu temples are full of activities on this day.
Yellow colour is given special importance on this day. On Vasant Panchami, Saraswati is dressed in yellow garments and worshipped (with Puja, Havan etc.). Men and women try to wear yellow clothes on this day. Sweetmeats of yellowish hues are exchanged with relations and friends
Some people feed Brahmanas on this day. Pitri-Tarpan (ancestor worship) is done on this day. The god of love (Kamdev) is also worshipped on this day.
Children are taught their first words on this day (as an auspicious beginning to learning). Schools, colleges etc., (places of learning) organise special worship of Saraswati. Pandit Madan Mohan Malviya laid the foundations of Kashi Hindu Vishwa Vidyalaya on Vasant Panchami. This has become a world famous top class academic institution.
The first faint signals of the forthcoming festival of Holi manifest at Vasant Panchami. Seasons undergo change. The coming of springtime is heralded. Trees are displaying new shoots. New life is evident in the woods and fields. Nature decorates Mango trees with new blossoms. Wheat and other crops enliven with evidence of new life.
Vasant Panchami is a festival full of religious, seasonal and social significance and is celebrated by Hindus all over the world with verve and new sense of optimism.

Sivaratri or Mahashivratri:
Shivaratri, or Maha Shivaratri (Night of Shiva) is a Hindu festival, celebrated all over the country with great enthusiasm.
The festival usually falls every year on the 13th night/14th day in the Krishna Paksha of the month of Maagha (as per Shalivahana) or Phalguna (as per Vikrama) in the Hindu calendar.
The festival is exclusively dedicated to Lord Shiva who is known by hundreds of names.
Maha Shivratri is the day to rejoice…to pray to the almighty for wellness. Almost all Hindus throughout the world offer prayers in the morning/evening and some observe fasting ( vrata) throughout the day. Most people visit the nearby temples of Shiva and offer prayers in large crowds.
The prayers and worship continue throughout the night and the devotees offer coconut, Bilva leaves, fruits and specially prepared sacred food to Shiva and his divine consort Parvati.
As this is a dark fortnight, devotees light candles and diyas (a lamp made usually of clay, with wick made of cotton and dipped in ghee) throughout the night – this is a symbol of spiritual manifestation.

March:
Holi:
Holi is the Festival of Colors is marked as the opening festival in Hindu calendar, falls on the full moon day in the month of Phalgun. People enjoy themselves playing with several colours and celebrate the whole day with much pump and gaiety.
Originally Holi was regarded to be the festival to celebrate good harvests and fertility of the land. There are several legends and stories behind Holi. A popular legend says that Holi is remembered for the sacrifice of Holika who burnt herself in fire on this day.
Holi is therefore regarded one of the most ancient festivals of the Aryans who finds an honored mention in our old Sanskrit texts like Dashakumar Charit and Garud Puran. Even the play "Ratnavali" written by Harshdev states a delightful description of Holi as a festival. In those days this very festival was celebrated as "Vasantotsav". Latter everybody started calling it "MADANOTSAV".
Celebration of Holi festival is characterized by performing Holi puja as per Hindu tradition. Dhuleti, which falls day after Holi Puja, is considered to be the actual festival of colors. Children and youngsters vie with each other use fast and sticky colors to celebrate Holi. It is all fun and joy for them.
Chaitra Navratri:
Navratri, the festival of nine nights is dedicated to Goddess Durga and her nine forms. The nine days have great religious significance as Goddess Durga, the divine mother, had destroyed the evil force (in the form of the demon Mahisashura) during this period.
The festival is celebrated with true devotion and purity all over the country.
People from various sections of the society irrespective of caste and creed celebrate this festival by visiting temples and offering pujas at the Mother’s feet.
In some places special puja samarohas are also held by setting the images of Mother Durga on beautifully decorated pandals.
Temples dedicated to Shakti also make arrangement for pujas and bratas to mark these nine days as true symbols of devotion and adoration towards the divine mother.

April:
Ram Navami:
The birthday of Lord Rama, the celebrated hero of the famous epic, 'Ramayana', is enthusiastically celebrated on the ninth day of the waxing moon in the month of Chiatra, all over India. Lord Vishnu is worshipped in his human incarnation as Rama, the divine ruler of Ayodhya. Celebrations begin with a prayer to the Sun early in the morning. At midday, when Lord Rama is supposed to have been born, a special prayer is performed. People sing devotional songs in praise of Rama and rock, images of him in a cradle to celebrate his birth. Rathyatras or chariot processions of Ram, his wife Seeta, brother Lakshman and devotee Hanuman are held from many temples. People gather in thousands on the banks of the sacred river Sarayu for a dip. Some observe a strict fast on this day.
Ayodhya is the focus of great celebrations. Devotees throng the temples of Ayodhya and Pondicherry, two places closely connected with the events of the Ramayana to participate in Ramnavami festivities.
Mahavir Jayanti:
The Jain community celebrates the birth anniversary of the 24th and the last Tirthankara, Vardhman Mahavir, the founder of Jainism as Mahavir Jayanti every year.
The birth anniversary of the 24th and the last Tirthankara of the Jains, Vardhman Mahavir, the founder of Jainism, is celebrated by the Jain community in March.  Born a prince in 599 BC, Mahavir renounced worldly life at the age of 30 and undertook austere penance until he achieved realisation.

Baisakhi:
Baisakhi is a seasonal festival with a special accent. It is celebrated all over the State on the first of Baisakh. This is the time when harvest is gathered in and the farmer exults in the fulfillment of his year's hard work.
He joins the merry-making with full gusto and does not mind walking for miles to be able to do so. Since this fair is also an expression of prosperity, singing and dancing constitute its most enchanting features. The Punjab's famous Bhangra and Giddha are inextricably linked with this festival.
May:
Buddha Poornima:
Buddha Poornima, which falls on the full moon night in the month of Vaisakha (either in April or May), commemorates the birth anniversary of Lord Buddha, founder of Buddhism. Notwithstanding the summer heat (the temperature routinely touches 45 degrees C), pilgrims come from all over the world to Bodh Gaya to attend the Buddha Poornima celebrations.
The day is marked with prayer meets, sermons on the life of Gautam Buddha, religious discourses, continuous recitation of Buddhist scriptures, group meditation, processions, worship of the statue of Buddha. The Mahabodhi Temple wears a festive look and is decorated with colourful flags and flowers. The Chinese scholar, Fa-Hien has recorded celebration of this festival.

Bada Mangal

Bada Mangar is celebrated every Tuesday of Jeshtha(May-June) in Lucknow. In all there Tuesdays the worship of Rama’s devotee Hanuman is done. Bada Mangal is mainly observed in Lucknow in Uttar Pradesh and nearby regions. The origin of the festival is traced to the Naya Hanuman Mandir at Aliganj in Lucknow.
Bada Mangal is the name for more specifically used to describe the first Tuesday in the month of Jayeshta or Jeth. A big fair is organized in the region during the period. The fair and the festival is believed to be more than 400 years old became a symbol of Hindu-Muslim congeniality. No wonder Muslims too contribute whole-heartedly in arrangements for the Bada Mangal.

For more read on following link:
http://lucknowlive12.blogspot.in/2012/05/bada-mangal.html
June:
Guru Gobind Singh Jayanti:
Celebrated by the Sikhs, the birthday of their tenth and last guru, this day witnesses’ large processions and special prayer gatherings at all Gurudwaras.
Guru Gobind Singh, the tenth Nanak (Sikh Guru), was born at Patna Sahib on December 22, 1666, (Poh Sudi Saptmi). His birthday generally falls in December or January or sometimes twice within a year as it is calculated according to Hindu Bikrami Calendar, which is based on the lunar calendar. According to the Nanakshahi Calendar, the birthday of Guru Gobind Singh Sahib falls annually on January 5.
July:
Guru Purnima:
The full moon day in the month of Ashadh (July) of the Hindu calendar is celebrated as Guru Purnima by all Hindus all over. This day is celebrated as a mark of respect to the “Guru” i.e. a teacher or a preacher.
This day is celebrated in the sacred memory of the great sage Vyasa, the ancient saint who compiled the four Vedas, wrote 18 Puranas, the Mahabharata and the Srimad Bhagavata.
The day, also known as “Vyasa Purnima” is observed by devotees who offer pujas (worship) to their beloved Gurus. Sage Vyasa is known to be the Adi (original) Guru of the Hindu religion. The auspicious day of Vyaasa Poornima has a great significance as everybody knows that the role of a Guru in real life is very much important.
On this day several programs and cultural performances are organized by spiritual organizations. Divine discourse and bhajan samarohas are also organized to make the day more special.
Nag Panchami:
On the fifth day of the bright half of Shravan people worship the snake, “nag”. The day is known as “Nag Panchami”. Naga Panchami is the festival of snakes celebrated on the fifth day of the bright fortnight in the month of Shriven. The festival falls during the rainy months and is believed to counter the increased possibility of a snake bite during this time. People visit temples specially dedicated to snakes and worship them. Shiva temples are also favoured places for veneration as snakes are considered dear to him. In South India, people craft images of snakes using cow dung on either side of the entrance to the house to welcome the snake god. Some go to worship the snake which is believed to be hiding in the holes of anthills. Or else a five hood snake is made by mixing “gandh” (a fragrant pigment), “halad-kumkum” (turmeric powder), “chandan” (sandal) and “keshar” (saffron) and placed on a metal plate and worshipped. This practice of worshipping the snake on this day is related to the following story..
August:
Teej:
According to Hindu mythology, on the 3rd day (teej) after the new moon in the month of Shravan Goddess Parvati went to the house of lord Shiva, her husband and was united with him.
Teej is celebrated in India especially by women in the months of July-August marking the advent of monsoons. It has great significance in Rajasthan as it is observed to provide relief from the scorching heat of summer. Thus, it is popularly called the Sawan Festival.
Raksha Bandhan:
Rakhi is basically a sacred thread of protection embellished with the love and affection of a sister for her brother. This day is also known as Raksha Bandhan and celebrated on the full moon day of the Hindu month of Shravana in India. This frail of thread of Rakhi is considered as stronger than iron chains as it binds the most beautiful relationship in an inseparable bond of love and trust. Rakhi festival also has a social significance because it underlines the notion that everybody should live in harmonious coexistence with each other.
Independence Day:
India celebrates Independence Day on August 15 each year. India became an independent nation on August 15, 1947, so a gazetted holiday is held annually to remember this date.
Independence Day is a day when people in India pay homage to their leaders and those who fought for India's freedom in the past. The period leading up to Independence Day is a time when major government buildings are illuminated with strings of lights and the tricolor flutters from homes and other buildings. Broadcast, print and online media may have special contests, programs, and articles to promote the day. Movies about India's freedom fighters are also shown on television.
The president delivers the '"Address to the Nation" on the eve of Independence Day. India's prime minister unfurls India's flag and holds a speech at the Red Fort in Old Dehli. Flag hoisting ceremonies and cultural programs are held in the state capitals and often involve many schools and organizations.
Many people spend the day with family members or close friends. They may eat a picnic in a park or private garden, go to a film or eat lunch or dinner at home or in a restaurant. Other people go kite flying or sing or listen to patriotic songs.
Independence Day is a gazetted holiday in India on August 15 each year. National, state and local government offices, post offices and banks are closed on this day. Stores and other businesses and organizations may be closed or have reduced opening hours.
Krishna Janamashtami:
The birthday of Hinduism's favorite Lord Krishna is a special occasion for Hindus, who consider him their leader, hero, protector, philosopher, teacher and friend all rolled into one.
Krishna took birth at midnight on the ashtami or the 8th day of the Krishnapaksha or dark fortnight in the Hindu month of Shravan (August-September). This auspicious day is called Janmashtami. Indian as well as Western scholars have now accepted the period between 3200 and 3100 BC as the period in which Lord Krishna lived on earth. Read about the story of his birth.
How do Hindus celebrate Janmashtami? The devotees of Lord Krishna observe fast for the whole day and night, worshipping him and keeping vigil through the night while listening to his tales and exploits, recite hymns from the Gita, sing devotional songs, and chant the mantra Om namo Bhagavate Vasudevaya.
Krishna's birthplace Mathura and Vrindavan celebrate this occasion with great pomp and show. Raslilas or religious plays are performed to recreate incidents from the life of Krishna and to commemorate his love for Radha.
Song and dance mark the celebration of this festive occasion all over northern India. At midnight, the statue of infant Krishna is bathed and placed in a cradle, which is rocked, amidst the blowing of conch shells and the ringing of bells.
In the south western state of Maharashtra, people enact the god's childhood attempts to steal butter and curd from earthen pots beyond his reach. A similar pot is suspended high above the ground and groups of young people form humans pyramids to try and reach the pot and break it.
The town of Dwarka in Gujarat, Krishna's own land, comes alive with major celebrations as hordes of visitors flock to the town.
Hartalika Teej:
Hartalika Teej is the biggest of the various variation of Teej. Hartalika Teej falls on the third day of the first fortnight of the month of 'Bhadra'. It is a three-day festival which is celebrated by women in honor of Parvati Ma. On this day, womenfolk keep fast for long and conjugal life of their husband. Hartalika Teej fast proceeds without even drinking a drop of water. By rigorous fasting and praying to Goddess Parvati on Hartalika Teej, married women are blessed with healthy life of their husband while the unmarried girls are said to be blessed by a husband like Lord Shiva.
Id-ul-Fitr:
Eid ul Fitr or the 'festival of fast breaking' is the most celebratory of all Muslim festivals. The term 'Eid' has been derived from the Arabic word 'oud', which means 'the return' and hence, signifies the return of the festival each year. The festival is significant as much for its timing, as for its religious implications. It is celebrated after the long fasting month of Ramadan (the ninth month of the Islamic calendar), on the first day of the Shawwal month of the Hijri year (Islamic calendar). Legend says that the Qur'an was revealed to Prophet Mohammed in the last ten days of Ramadan.

Ramzan (Roza):
Ramzan is the ninth month according to Islamic Lunar calendar. Ramzan (written as Ramadan) is derived from the Arabic root word 'ramida' or 'arramad' that means intense scorching heat and dryness, especially of the ground. Ramadan is so called to indicate the heating sensation in the stomach as a result of thirst. Others said it is so called because Ramadan scorches out the sins as it burns the ground. Some said it is so called because the hearts and souls are more readily receptive to the admonition and remembrance of Allah during Ramadan, as the sand and stones are receptive to the sun's heat.
September:
Ganesh Chaturthi:
Ganesha Chaturthi, the great Ganesha festival, also known as 'Vinayak Chaturthi' or 'Vinayaka Chavithi' is celebrated by Hindus around the world as the birthday of Lord Ganesha. It is observed during the Hindu month of Bhadra (mid-August to mid-September) and the grandest and most elaborate of them, especially in the western India state of Maharashtra, lasts for 10 days, ending on the day of 'Ananta Chaturdashi'.
Teacher’s Day:
In India 5th September is celebrated as Teachers' day as a mark of tribute to the contribution made by teachers to the society. 5th September is the birthday of a great teacher Dr. Sarvapalli Radhakrishnan, who was a staunch believer of education, and was the well-known diplomat, scholar, president of India and above all a teacher.
Radha Asthmi:
Birthday of Radha is celebrated as Radhaashtami throughout the country and especially in the north, with full devotion and joy. Radha Ashtami is observed after 15 days of Janmashtami, which is celebrated as the birthday of Lord Krishna. Radharani's birthday is the sacred eighth day of the month of Bhadrapada (August-September). Sri Radha was born in Barsana, suburb of Mathura and appeared as the daughter of Vrishabhanu and Kirti.
Annant Chaturdashi:
Anant Chaturthi (or Anant Chaturdashi) is the last day of the “Ganesh festival” celebrated in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh. It is the tenth day after Ganesh Chaturthi which falls on the 14th day of the bright Bhadrapada (the sixth month of Hindu calendar). The day follows the immersion of the idols of the beloved Lord but to be welcomed the next year with equal fervor. Some people observe a vow in honour of Lord Vishnu, which if kept for 14 years is supposed to bring wealth.
Vishwakarma Puja:
Hindus widely regard Vishwakarma as the god of architecture and engineering, and September 16 or 17 every year is celebrated as Vishwakarma Puja — a resolution time for workers and craftsmen to increase productivity and gain divine inspiration for creating novel products. This ritual usually takes place within the factory premises or shop floor, and the otherwise mundane workshops come alive with fiesta. Vishwakarma Puja is also associated with the buoyant custom of flying kites. This occasion in a way also marks the start of the festive season that culminates in Diwali.
October:
Mahatama Gandhi Jayanti:
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, Mahatma Gandhi, the apostle of peace and the Father of the Nation was born on 2nd October 1869 at Porbandar in Gujarat. Gandhi Jayanti is celebrated on the very day every year as the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi, Father of India.







Dusshera:
Dussehra (Vijaya Dashami, Dasara, or Dashain) is a Hindu festival that celebrates the victory of good over evil. It is a gazetted holiday in India, which is marked on the 10th day of the bright half (Shukla Paksha) of the month of Ashvin (Ashwayuja), according to the Hindu calendar.
This celebration starts from Navratri and ends with the tenth day festival of “Dussehra”. Navratri and Dussehra is celebrated throughout the country at the same time, with varying rituals, but with great enthusiasm and energy as it marks the end of scorching summer and the start of winter season.
The tenth day after Navratri is called Dussehra, on which number of fairs are organized throughout the northern India, burning effigies of Ravana.It is also called “Vijayadashmi” as this day marks the victory of Lord Rama over Ravana. VijayaDashami is considered to be an auspicious day for the Indian householder, on which he worships, protects and preserves 'Shakti' (power). According to Scriptures, by worshipping the 'Shakti' on these nine-days the householders attain the threefold power i.e. physical, mental and spiritual, which helps him to progress in life without any difficulty.
The 'Ramlila' - an enactment of the life of Lord Rama, is held during the nine days preceding Dussehra. On the tenth day (Dussehra or Vijay Dasami), larger than life effigies of Ravana, his son and brother - Meghnadh and Kumbhakarna are set to fire.
Sharad Poornima:
The first full moon day of the month  of Ashwin is known as Sharad Purnima. It is also referred to as Rasa Purnima, or Sharath Purnima. The festival is also referred as Kaumudi Festival, Kaumudi meaning moonlight.
The bright light on this full moon day marks the changing season, the end of monsoon.
The dazzling night is associated with the divine love filled Raas Lila (Expression of love by graceful dance) of Lord Krishna with Radha and Gopis.
This mythological past related to Sharad Purnima, makes it the best time to manifest love between couples. The day is also referred as Rasa Purnima or Raas Lila Day.
Sharad Poornima is also known as Kojagari Poornima. It is believed that on this night Goddess Lakshmi visits from place to place asking “Kojagari??” meaning “Who is awake” and bless those who are found awake.
Hence people don’t sleep this night and spend whole night by playing games, singing and doing all amusing activities.
Their  is ritual that in night Amrit is dropped from sky. So prepared kheer, or sweets is kept in moonlight through out the night and distributed as Prasad on the next day.
Id-Ul-Zuha (Bakr-Id):
Id-ul-Zuha (Bakr-Id), which is also known as Eid al-Adha or Id-ul-Adha, is a festival that many Muslims celebrate with special prayers, greetings and gifts. It is a gazetted holiday in India and is also referred to as the festival of sacrifice.
November:
Karwa Chauth:
Karwa Chauth is celebrated mostly by the married women in North India. On this day, they observe a fast, praying for the long life, well being and prosperity of their husband. They break their fast in the evening, after moonrise. On this sacred festival, people come together and socialize with friends and family, exchange gifts and share home-cooked meals. It also provides an opportunity to all married women, to get close to their in-laws. Karwa Chauth is the festival which reflects joy, splendor, brightness and happiness of a married life.
Tulsi Vivaha:
Tulsi Vivah is considered the beginning of the wedding season in India in the month of Kartik, which occurs in October/November every year. Tulsi vivah is conducted on the day after Kartik Ekadashi (the eleventh bright day of the new moon, Amavasya). According to Hindu mythology, Tulsi is ceremonially married to Lord Vishnu on this day. The festival continues for five days and concludes on the full moon day.
he festival is based on the legend of the marriage (or vivah) of the holy basil plant (or Tulsi) with Lord Vishnu. The tulsi plant is considered holy by many hindus and traditional hindu homes used to have tulsi plant growing in the courtyard. Offerings were made to the tulsi plant every morning and evening during the daily prayers.
Tulsi is considered to be an incarnation of Maha Lakshmi, who was born as Vrinda in her previous birth. Vrinda was married to a demon king Jalandhar. But she prayed to Lord Vishnu that her demon husband would be protected, with the result that no God was able to harm him. However on the request of the other gods, Lord Vishnu took the form of Jalandhar and stayed with the unsuspecting Tulsi. When the truth emerged after Jalandhar’s death, Vrinda crused Vishnu and turned him to stone (Shaligram) and collapsed. From her body emerged the tulsi plant. That is why Vishnu pooja is considered incomplete without tulsi leaves.. Since then, every year Tulsi is married to Lord Vishnu and the event is known as Tulsi Shaligram Vivah. It is said that the person who performs the custom of giving away Tulsi to Lord Vishnu, considering her to be his own daughter, is considered to earn the credit of performing kanya-daan.
Another legend says that Tulsi came out of the ocean during Amrita manthan as a younger sister of Lakshmi. She was devoted to Lord Vishnu and wanted to marry him but Lakshmi, who was already married to him, did not like the idea and cursed her to become a plant. Thus the tulsi plant was born. But the all merciful Lord Vishnu took pity and fulfilling her wish declared that when he will be in the form of a saligram she will remain close to him in the form of a tulsi leaf.
Guru Nanak Jayanti:
Guru Nanak Dev, the first Sikh guru and the founder of the Sikh religion, was born on the full moon day in the month of Kartik as per the Hindu calendar. Hence, his birthday is celebrated as Guru Nanak Jayanti. The date falls in October or November in the Gregorian calendar. Guru Nanak was born in 1469 A.D. at Rai-Bhoi-di Talwandi, some 30 miles from Lahore, in the present Pakistan. The Sikhs visit Gurdwaras where special programs are arranged and kirtans (religious songs) are sung. Houses and Gurdwaras are decorated and lit up to add to the festivities.
Deepawali:
Diwali or Deepawali or Dipawali is one the most important, hugely waited and immensely cherished festival celebrated across India and in parts of Nepal. Originally, the name was Deepawali, which has its origin from Sanskrit, meaning “rows of Deep”.
Over the years the name has been pronounced as Diwali, especially in Hindi, whereas it still remains Dipawali in Nepali. Diwali also popularly known as “Festival of Lights” is celebrated with great gusto and is observed as an official holiday across in India.
The festival of Diwali is not only significant to Hindus, but, has importance in Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism. For Hindus, it is associated with the return of Lord Rama to Ayodhya, after his 14 years of exile and victory over the demon Ravana.
On that day, he was welcomed to the kingdom to Ayodhya with rows of Deep, lightened throughout the kingdom.
Thus, there is a tradition of lighting oil lamps that symbolize the victory of good over evil and freedom from spiritual darkness.
Hindus, also make preparations to welcome goddess Lakshmi by drawing rangoli, and footsteps (Paduka) On the entrance that would allure goddess Laksmi to visit one’s home and bring prosperity along with her.
There are numerous customs and traditions associated with Diwali, namely, burning of crackers, playing cards, lightning of lamps, wearing new clothes, distribution of sweets, exchange of gifts etc.
Diwali celebrations spread across five days, with each day having its own significance and set of rituals.
The first day is called “Dhanteras”, on which new utensils and silver ware is brought to the house. The second day is called “Chhoti Diwali”, which normally involves preparation for the next day and the tradition of playing cards is observed in many families.
The next day, or third day is the “Badi Diwali”, which involves the worshiping of mother Lakshmi.The fourth day is the Govardhan Puja and finally the five days end with Bhai Dooj.
Goverdhan Puja:
The fourth day of Diwali celebrations is 'Padwa' or 'Varshapratipada'. In the North India, it is called as Govardhan Puja. This pooja is performed with great zeal and enthusiasm and in the states of Punjab, Haryana, Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. In this pooja, there is a tradition of building cow dung hillocks, which symbolize the Mount Govardhan, the mountain which was once lifted by Lord Krishna. After making such hillocks people decorate them with flowers and then worship them. They move in a circle all round the cow dung hillocks and offer prayers to Lord Govardhan.
Bhaiya Dooj:
fter the high voltage celebrations of Diwali, the festival of lights and fire-crackers, sisters all over India get ready for 'Bhai Dooj' - when sisters ceremonize their love by putting an auspicious tilak or a vermilion mark on the forehead of their brothers and perform an aarti of him by showing him the light of the holy flame as a mark of love and protection from evil forces. Sisters are lavished with gifts, goodies and blessings from their brothers.
Bhai Dooj comes every year on the fifth and last day of Diwali, which falls on a new moon night. The name 'Dooj' means the second day after the new moon, the day of the festival, and 'Bhai' means brother.
Childrens Day:
Children's day, in hindi known as "Bal Diwas", in India falls on November 14th every year and for good reason. Children's day in India is celebrated on Pandit Nehru's birthday as a day of fun and frolic, a celebration of childhood, children and Nehruji's love for them.
Muharram:
The Mourning of Muharram is an important period of mourning in Shia Islam, taking place in Muharram which is the first month of the Islamic calendar. It is also called the Remembrance of Muharram
December:
Guru Teg Bhadur Punya Divas:
Guru Teg Bahadur was son of the 6 th Guru, Guru Hari Gobind. His earlier name was Tiyag Mal. He took very active part in the fights against rulers along with his father Guru. Seeing his bravery, his father Guru named him 'the Brave of the Sword' - Teg Bahadur. On the advice of his Guru father, he went in seclude in Prayers to God for about 25 years in village Bakaala till the year 1665AD, when offered Guruship.
Shanishchari Amavasya:
Amavasya, or Amavasi, is the name of new moon night in Hindu religion. It is the first night of the first quarter of the lunar month. Since the moon is invisible on the day, Amavasya is also referred as no moon night. Amavasi holds great importance in Hinduism. Many Hindus choose this day to make offering (tharpanam) to the dead ancestors. There is also an ongoing debate whether Amavasya is auspicious or inauspicious.
The term ‘Amavasya’ is commonly used in all regional languages in India. The fortnight that starts with Amavasya is also referred as the Shukla paksha (bright half of the month). Mauni Amavasya in Hindu Magh month (January – February) and Mahalya Amvasya in Ashwayuja (September – October) are highly auspicious. Similarly the Amavasi in Aadi month is of great importance in Tamil Nadu. The Amavasya in Karkidakam month is of importance in Kerala.
Christmas Day:
Christmas is both a sacred religious holiday and a worldwide cultural and commercial phenomenon. For two millennia, people around the world have been observing it with traditions and practices that are both religious and secular in nature. Christians celebrate Christmas Day as the anniversary of the birth of Jesus of Nazareth, a spiritual leader whose teachings form the basis of their religion. Popular customs include exchanging gifts, decorating Christmas trees, attending church, sharing meals with family and friends and, of course, waiting for Santa Claus to arrive. December 25–Christmas Day–has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1870.



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